CFP: 5 Sessions at CAA (Chicago, 12-15 Feb 20)

College Art Association CAA2020 annual conference, Chicago, Illinois, USA, February 12 – 15, 2020

[1] Selling and buying anonymity
[2] What Can Art Say About Extinction?
[3] The Collector and Cultural Narratives
[4] The Image of the Female Artist
[5] Kitsch and Craft in the Middle Ages

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CAA Now Accepting Nominations for the CAA/American Institute for Conservation Award for Distinction in Scholarship and Conservation

CAA is now accepting nominations for the Artist Award for a Distinguished Body of Work and the Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement.

The Artist Award for a Distinguished Body of Work, first presented in 1988, is a peer award given to an artist for exceptional work through exhibitions, presentations, or performances. This award is presented to a living artist of national or international stature and must tie them to an exceptional recent exhibition.

In the twenty-two years since the Artist Award for a Distinguished Body of Work was first presented, the majority of recipients have been women. Four of the first five—Elizabeth Murray, Howardena Pindell, Rachel Rosenthal, and Ann Hamilton—are women, as are seven recent winners, which include Yoko Ono, Mary Heilmann, Lynda Benglis, Adrian Piper, and Elaine Sturtevant. Other recipients of the award include Bruce Nauman, Nam June Paik, Fred Wilson and, most recently, Ursula von Rydingsvard.

The Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement, first presented in 1988, celebrates the career of an artist who, among other distinctions, has demonstrated particular commitment to their work throughout a long career and has had an important impact nationally and internationally on the field.

One of CAA’s most illustrious prizes, the Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement has recognized the long, prominent, and influential careers of many contemporary artists, among them Joan Mitchell and Louise Bourgeois in the 1980s; Willem de Kooning, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, and John Baldessari in the 1990s; and Alison Knowles, Elizabeth Murray, Chris Burden, and Howardena Pindell in the present decade.

Nominations are due September 4, 2019. Nominations should be sent by email to Cali Buckley, CAA Grants and Special Programs Manager, at cbuckley@collegeart.org. For more information about award requirements and qualifications, please visit: http://www.collegeart.org/programs/awards/nominations

Institutional Development with Rebecca Nagy

In this first segment of RAAMP’s video practica, Hunter O’Hanian, Executive Director at CAA, speaks with Rebecca Nagy, Director of the Harn Museum of Art, about the museum’s institutional advancement. In the interview, O’Hanian and Nagy discuss the museum’s tactics in attracting visitors from not only the University of Florida, but also the community at large. Nagy expresses the importance of fundraising and creating partnerships with the different colleges on campus and schools in the area. Nagy also gives advice on creating a fundraising program.

NEH Funding Opportunities

NEH has updated the guidelines for their two grant programs: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections and Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller Institutions. 

Both programs have a deadline of January 31, 2019.

Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Grants are available for both planning (up to $40,000) and implementation (up to $350,000)

The Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections (SCHC) program helps cultural institutions meet the complex challenge of preserving large and diverse holdings of humanities materials for future generations by supporting sustainable conservation measures that mitigate deterioration, prolong the useful life of collections, and support institutional resilience: the ability to anticipate and respond to disasters resulting from natural or human activity. Institutions can accomplish this work most effectively through preventive conservation. Preventive conservation encompasses managing relative humidity, temperature, light, and pollutants in collection spaces; providing protective storage enclosures and systems for collections; and safeguarding collections from theft, fire, floods, and other disasters.
https://www.neh.gov/grants/preservation/sustaining-cultural-heritage-collections

Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller Institutions
**New this year** Awards for up to $10,000

Preservation Assistance Grants help small and mid-sized institutions—such as libraries, museums, historical societies, archival repositories, cultural organizations, town and county records offices, and colleges and universities—improve their ability to preserve and care for their significant humanities collections. These may include special collections of books and journals, archives and manuscripts, prints and photographs, moving images, sound recordings, architectural and cartographic records, decorative and fine art objects, textiles, archaeological and ethnographic artifacts, furniture, historical objects, and digital materials. Applicants must draw on the knowledge of consultants whose preservation skills and experience are related to the types of collections and the nature of the activities on which their projects focus.
https://www.neh.gov/grants/preservation/preservation-assistance-grants-smaller-institutions

 

Accepting Applications: Collections Assessment for Preservation (CAP) Program

The Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (FAIC) is excited to announce that applications are open for the 2019 Collections Assessment for Preservation (CAP) program from November 1st 2018, with a deadline of February 1, 2019.

The CAP program is open to small and medium-sized museums, zoos, aquariums, arboreta, and botanical gardens in the United States. Participating institutions receive funding for a general conservation assessment from a qualified collections and building assessor. The assessment is a study of all the institution’s collections, buildings, and building systems, as well as its policies and procedures relating to collections care. The two assessors work collaboratively to provide institutions with prioritized recommendations for improved collections care. Assessments consist of preparatory work, a two-day site visit, a written report, and a one-year follow-up consultation. CAP is often a first step for small institutions that wish to improve the condition of their collections or develop a long-range preservation plan, and can serve as a fundraising tool for future collections projects. Additional information on the CAP process, eligibility, and applications are available at www.conservation-us.org/cap.  CAP is administered by FAIC under a cooperative agreement with the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

Spelman awarded grant from the Walton Family Foundation to increase diversity in museum field

Spelman College has announced that it has received a $5.4 million grant from the Walton Family Foundation to establish the Atlanta University Center Collective for the Study of Art History and Curatorial Studies. In conjunction with Walton Family Foundation grants to fund scholarships at Morehouse College and Clark Atlanta University, the new initiative will result in the creation of an Art History major and Curatorial Studies minor at the Atlanta University Center.

The goal of the package of grants is to foster innovation and create an educational pipeline into art museum leadership that is more representative of our nation’s increasing diversity. The initiative will position the Atlanta University Center as a leading incubator of African-American museum professionals in the United States.

Read the full press release here.