RAAMP Coffee Gathering: Engaging Educators in Art Museum Galleries

RAAMP Coffee Gathering: Engaging Educators in Art Museum Galleries

Our latest Coffee Gathering was with Dana Carlisle Kletchka, an Assistant Professor of Art Museum Education in the Department of Arts Administration, Education, and Policy at The Ohio State University. Her research areas include post-critical art museum education theory; professional development for PreK–12 teachers in art museum contexts; the use of social media and digital technologies on interpretation and engagement in the art museum; and the professional positionality of art museum educators within the profound paradigmatic shift of art museums over the last 40 years. In 2015, she was awarded the National Art Education Association’s Art Educator of the Year for the Museum Education division.

Over the past 20 years, she held professional education positions as Curator of Education at the Palmer Museum of Art at The Pennsylvania State University, as an Affiliate Assistant Professor in the School of Visual Arts, and as co-director of the Summer Institute of Contemporary Art (SICA), a joint project of SoVA and the Palmer Museum of Art. She was also the Coordinator of Docent and Interpretive Programs at The Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa, OK, and a Curatorial Intern in Art Museum Education at the Spencer Museum of Art, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS.

She is the co-editor and co-author of the recently published book Professional Development in Art Museums: Strategies of Engagement Through Contemporary Art with B. Stephen Carpenter, II.

Professional Development in Art Museums: Strategies of Engagement Through Contemporary Art explores the research and practice of professional development for preK-12 teachers in art museums, with emphasis on curricular possibilities, conceptual considerations, historical precedents, learner-centered teaching, critical teaching strategies, and communities of practice. Three sections fill this book with examples, strategies, and possibilities for educators interested in enriching teaching and learning in conversation with the art and issues of our times.

In this innovative anthology, co-editors Dana Carlisle Kletchka and B. Stephen Carpenter, II have compiled translations and examinations of theory and practice at the intersection of collaborative professional development, art museums, and contemporary art. To this end, a diverse group of art educators and art museum educators add to a growing body of knowledge about the purposeful reflections and dialogues, inspiring curricula, and innovative pedagogies that inform professional development experiences in art museum contexts.

Links


Kress Foundation Study on Academic Art Museums

 

Mellon Foundation Art Museum Staff Demographic Survey, 2018

 

Social Justice and Museums Resource List

See LaTanya Autry (@artstuffmatters) on issues of social justice and museums

 

Art museum education specializations situated in art education programs at major universities and their contacts:

The Ohio State University—Dr. Dana Carlisle Kletchka

The Florida State University—Dr. Pat Villeneuve and Dr. Ann Rowson Love

Teacher’s College at Columbia University—Olga Hubard

University of North Texas—Dr. Laura Evans

 

Summer Institute on Contemporary Art at Penn State (SICA):

On Sites , Twitter, and Instagram @sica_pennstate

Dr. B. Stephen Carpenter, faculty in charge

Dr. Olivia Gude, former visiting scholar: http://www.saic.edu/profiles/faculty/olivia-gude

Dr. Terry Barrett, former visiting scholar: http://terrybarrettosu.com/

 

National Art Education Foundation

 

RSVP for our next Coffee Gathering on Professional Development for PreK–12 Teachers

Engaging Educators in Art Museum Galleries: Professional Development for PreK–12 Teachers
Monday, April 29, 2019 at 1:00 PM Eastern

Our next Coffee Gathering will be with Dana Carlisle Kletchka, an Assistant Professor of Art Museum Education in the Department of Arts Administration, Education, and Policy at The Ohio State University. Her research areas include post-critical art museum education theory; professional development for PreK–12 teachers in art museum contexts; the use of social media and digital technologies on interpretation and engagement in the art museum; and the professional positionality of art museum educators within the profound paradigmatic shift of art museums over the last 40 years. In 2015, she was awarded the National Art Education Association’s Art Educator of the Year for the Museum Education division.

Over the past 20 years, she held professional education positions as Curator of Education at the Palmer Museum of Art at The Pennsylvania State University, as an Affiliate Assistant Professor in the School of Visual Arts, and as co-director of the Summer Institute of Contemporary Art (SICA), a joint project of SoVA and the Palmer Museum of Art. She was also the Coordinator of Docent and Interpretive Programs at The Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa, OK, and a Curatorial Intern in Art Museum Education at the Spencer Museum of Art, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS.

She is the co-editor and co-author of the recently published book Professional Development in Art Museums: Strategies of Engagement Through Contemporary Art with B. Stephen Carpenter, II.

Professional Development in Art Museums: Strategies of Engagement Through Contemporary Art explores the research and practice of professional development for preK-12 teachers in art museums, with emphasis on curricular possibilities, conceptual considerations, historical precedents, learner-centered teaching, critical teaching strategies, and communities of practice. Three sections fill this book with examples, strategies, and possibilities for educators interested in enriching teaching and learning in conversation with the art and issues of our times.

In this innovative anthology, co-editors Dana Carlisle Kletchka and B. Stephen Carpenter, II have compiled translations and examinations of theory and practice at the intersection of collaborative professional development, art museums, and contemporary art. To this end, a diverse group of art educators and art museum educators add to a growing body of knowledge about the purposeful reflections and dialogues, inspiring curricula, and innovative pedagogies that inform professional development experiences in art museum contexts.

To RSVP to this Coffee Gathering, please contact Cali Buckley at cbuckley@collegeart.org. Once you RSVP, you will receive an email with a link to the conversation on the day of the gathering.

Webinar on Virtual Reality for Object Display

DESCRIPTION:

Did you know that you can take any objects around you and create virtual reality content and lessons based on those objects? Join us on a journey through the Grasslands, Pre-Historic Times, and Native American Pottery, with the Museum of Texas Tech University, currently combining 3D scanning with zSpace augmented and virtual reality (AR/VR) to display historical objects in a virtual environment. With AR/VR at the museum, students and visitors are able to examine, interact, and explore these historical objects in a much more realistic, lifelike way, sparking curiosity and boosting their engagement, depth of understanding, and retention.
This educational webinar will allow attendees to:
  1. Learn how to create virtual models of material objects
  2. See the impact of AR/VR on museum exhibits, collections, and visitor experiences with a tour of AR/VR at the Museum of Texas Tech University
  3. Identify unique ways to incorporate AR/VR into social studies classes

Sign up here: https://info.zspace.com/historical-objects-in-a-virtual-world-integrating-ar-vr-into-social-studies

DATE: Tuesday March 19, 2019                     

TIME: 2:00 PM (PST) / 5:00 PM (EST)

CAA Conversations Podcast: Open Educational Resources (OER)

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

This week, Rosie Liljenquist and Anne Diekema discuss Open Educational Resources (OER).

Rose Liljenquist is an Open Educational Resources librarian at Gerald Sherratt Library, Southern Utah University. Anne Diekema is also a librarian at Gerald Sherratt Library and an assistant professor at Southern Utah Univeristy.

December Coffee Gathering Recording and Resources

Image: ©MIT List Visual Arts Center

Is that a Picasso in Your Dorm Room? Recording

If RAAMP followers have any lingering questions regarding the student loan programs at MIT’s List Center for Visual Arts, Williams College of Art Museum, or the Rose Art Museum following December’s Coffee Gathering, please contact:

Ariana Webber, Registrar for Exhibitions at the MIT List Visual Arts Center; amwebber@mit.edu

Diane Hart, Senior Museum Registrar for Collections and Exhibitions at the Williams College Museum of Art; dhart@williams.edu

Jessica Cloer, Associate Registrar at the Rose Art Museum; jcloer@brandeis.edu

Guide to Art Lending Programs for Students in Institutions of Higher Learning

Jessica Cloer’s 20176 Capstone Thesis from her graduate work at the Harvard University Extension School

Download (PDF, Unknown)

MIT List Visual Arts Center Student Lending Program Loan Agreement

Download (PDF, Unknown)

 

MIT List Visual Arts Center Student Loan Handout

Download (PDF, Unknown)

Williams College Museum of Art WALLS Art Loan Form

NEH Funding Opportunities

NEH has updated the guidelines for their two grant programs: Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections and Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller Institutions. 

Both programs have a deadline of January 31, 2019.

Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Grants are available for both planning (up to $40,000) and implementation (up to $350,000)

The Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections (SCHC) program helps cultural institutions meet the complex challenge of preserving large and diverse holdings of humanities materials for future generations by supporting sustainable conservation measures that mitigate deterioration, prolong the useful life of collections, and support institutional resilience: the ability to anticipate and respond to disasters resulting from natural or human activity. Institutions can accomplish this work most effectively through preventive conservation. Preventive conservation encompasses managing relative humidity, temperature, light, and pollutants in collection spaces; providing protective storage enclosures and systems for collections; and safeguarding collections from theft, fire, floods, and other disasters.
https://www.neh.gov/grants/preservation/sustaining-cultural-heritage-collections

Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller Institutions
**New this year** Awards for up to $10,000

Preservation Assistance Grants help small and mid-sized institutions—such as libraries, museums, historical societies, archival repositories, cultural organizations, town and county records offices, and colleges and universities—improve their ability to preserve and care for their significant humanities collections. These may include special collections of books and journals, archives and manuscripts, prints and photographs, moving images, sound recordings, architectural and cartographic records, decorative and fine art objects, textiles, archaeological and ethnographic artifacts, furniture, historical objects, and digital materials. Applicants must draw on the knowledge of consultants whose preservation skills and experience are related to the types of collections and the nature of the activities on which their projects focus.
https://www.neh.gov/grants/preservation/preservation-assistance-grants-smaller-institutions