How Time Spent in an Art Museum Can Improve Medical Students’ Skills

Each year, the Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia hosts a two hour “Clinician’s Eye” workshop for second-year medical students. The workshop allows medical students to work on their observational skills and practice gathering clues to formulate decisions.

Curator M. Jordan Love, medical humanities professor Marcia Childress, and docent coordinator Emily Lazaro worked with students throughout this workshop.

Childress argued, “In a museum setting, we can slow down that process for them. It helps build reflexes they will need in a clinical setting, when they have to react and learn very quickly.” [UVA Today]

Curatorial Mini-Intensive – Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance, Wesleyan University

The Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance invites applications for a fall edition of its curatorial mini-intensive for those interested in ICPP’s MA program. A small number of participants will be selected to attend two days of classes and exchanges of ideas on November 7–8, 2019 at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut. The program will include intimate conversations with curators, artists, writers, scholars, and presenters. The curriculum will address time-based art practices through the work of artists and cultural leaders across the fields of dance, performance art, theater, and music. Discussions will range from ethical issues in curation and current topics in the art and performance fields to a range of interdisciplinary projects and the sharing of critical methods and practices.

The curatorial mini-intensive is free, and provides accommodation as well as a modest travel stipend. For full consideration, please submit the following documents to icpp@wesleyan.edu by October 13, 2019.

Letter of intent (one page)
Current curriculum vitae (up to three pages)

About ICPP
ICPP offers a 2-year low-residency Master of Arts in Performance Curation featuring:
–The opportunity to pursue an MA degree alongside other professional responsibilities
–An innovative curriculum and an individualized learning environment with small-sized classes
–3 residencies on Wesleyan University’s campus each year
–A modular learning structure that allows participants to study and work with an extensive curatorial community
–Eligibility for financial aid

ICPP is the first institute of its kind, a center for the study of the presentation and contextualization of contemporary performance. Distinct from graduate programs in Curatorial Studies, Arts Administration, Performance Studies, and the Humanities, ICPP offers students a graduate-level education in curatorial approaches to developing and presenting dance, theater, performance, and other time-based arts.

The Master of Arts in Performance Curation is a two-year, low-residency program designed to study and enrich curatorial practices through intellectually rigorous and artist-centered methods, dialogues, writing, and fieldwork. ICPP works with a core group of faculty composed of renowned curators, artists, and scholars. Students and faculty meet three times a year on Wesleyan University’s campus, alongside engaging with field-wide symposia and artists’ residencies, and with visits to art institutions in New York City and the area. In addition, students have opportunities to work with a range of advisors on off-site practicums and independent projects tailored around their professional needs and research interests. Through the low-residency model, students simultaneously put ideas into practice in their professional lives, developing responsive curatorial practices that address performance as an artistic medium and a lens through which to interrogate and act upon social and political issues. Read what ICPP alumnx say about the program.

For more information about ICPP, click here. To contact us, email ICPP Program Manager Rosemary Lennox: rlennox@wesleyan.edu.

 

How the Delta Center for Culture & Learning Showcases Its Impact

The Delta Center for Culture & Learning at Delta State University plays a critical role in bringing the history and culture of the Mississippi Delta to the public. In addition to hosting an annual NEH Landmarks Workshop for School Teachers, “The Most Southern Place on Earth,” the center runs the International Delta Blues Project and manages the Mississippi Delta National Heritage Area (MDNHA). NHA recently completed a survey of the Delta Center’s Landmarks Workshop that explores the program’s longlasting impact on participants. Through qualitative and quantitative data, the results demonstrate that the program rejuvenates teachers, helps them incorporate creative and engaging pedagogies into their classrooms, and encourages continued professional development and strong professional networks. [National Humanities Alliance]

Museum Creates Program for Families Suffering from the Opioid Crisis

The Currier Museum of Art in Manchester, NH has created a program for those affected by the opioid crisis. New Hampshire is ranked number three in the nation for drug overdoses.

Lynn Thomson, an assistant director of education and community engagement, explains that the program began with a simple question: What is Manchester dealing with now, and what does the community need?Collaborating with the Partnership for Drug Free Kids, the Currier’s “Art of Hope” came to be. (Hyperallergic)

Image above: The Art of Hope program discussing Claude-Joseph Vernet’s “The Storm” (1759).

Faculty Workshop Agendas from the Allen Memorial Art Museum

During a recent Coffee Gathering: Curriculum Development Workshops with Liliana Milkova, Liliana Milkova discussed successful Curriculum Development Workshops she has hosted at Oberlin’s Allen Memorial Art Museum.

If you are organizing faculty workshops for professors or staff at your academic museum or gallery to integrate collections or exhibitions into their syllabi, you may find Liliana Milkova’s sample agendas a helpful resource.

Download (PDF, Unknown)

Download (PDF, Unknown)

 

 

Museum Access Consortium: Advancing Accessibility at New York’s Cultural Institutions for People with All Abilities

Museum Access Consortium

Following the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990, the Museum Access Consortium (MAC) was formed by a small group of museum and disability professionals that started meeting informally to discuss topics related to accessibility at their New York-based institutions. Today, MAC is an association that regularly hosts professional development workshops and offers a network of mutual support to help practitioners engage with disability advocates and people who have disabilities to learn about, implement, and strengthen best practices for access and inclusion in cultural facilities of all types throughout the New York metro area and beyond.