How Time Spent in an Art Museum Can Improve Medical Students’ Skills

Each year, the Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia hosts a two hour “Clinician’s Eye” workshop for second-year medical students. The workshop allows medical students to work on their observational skills and practice gathering clues to formulate decisions.

Curator M. Jordan Love, medical humanities professor Marcia Childress, and docent coordinator Emily Lazaro worked with students throughout this workshop.

Childress argued, “In a museum setting, we can slow down that process for them. It helps build reflexes they will need in a clinical setting, when they have to react and learn very quickly.” [UVA Today]

University of Chicago Students Make Acquisition for Smart Museum

With the input of ten undergraduate and graduate students from the University of Chicago, the Smart Museum of Art acquired several three new works of art from Viennacontemporary, Austria’s largest art fair. The fair founder, Dmitry Aksenov, invited the Smart Museum of Art to bring a group of students to choose works from the fair to add to the museum’s permanent collection.

Gearing up to the trip, the students read and discussed scholarship about the art market and fairs with Smart Museum staff members. They also researched the Smart’s collection. Art history graduate student Maggie Hire said that they were “especially interested in considering the ways in which a work of art would dialogue with other artworks from the collection and how that dialogue might promote learning moments.” [The Chicago Maroon]

 

Curatorial Mini-Intensive – Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance, Wesleyan University

The Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance invites applications for a fall edition of its curatorial mini-intensive for those interested in ICPP’s MA program. A small number of participants will be selected to attend two days of classes and exchanges of ideas on November 7–8, 2019 at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut. The program will include intimate conversations with curators, artists, writers, scholars, and presenters. The curriculum will address time-based art practices through the work of artists and cultural leaders across the fields of dance, performance art, theater, and music. Discussions will range from ethical issues in curation and current topics in the art and performance fields to a range of interdisciplinary projects and the sharing of critical methods and practices.

The curatorial mini-intensive is free, and provides accommodation as well as a modest travel stipend. For full consideration, please submit the following documents to icpp@wesleyan.edu by October 13, 2019.

Letter of intent (one page)
Current curriculum vitae (up to three pages)

About ICPP
ICPP offers a 2-year low-residency Master of Arts in Performance Curation featuring:
–The opportunity to pursue an MA degree alongside other professional responsibilities
–An innovative curriculum and an individualized learning environment with small-sized classes
–3 residencies on Wesleyan University’s campus each year
–A modular learning structure that allows participants to study and work with an extensive curatorial community
–Eligibility for financial aid

ICPP is the first institute of its kind, a center for the study of the presentation and contextualization of contemporary performance. Distinct from graduate programs in Curatorial Studies, Arts Administration, Performance Studies, and the Humanities, ICPP offers students a graduate-level education in curatorial approaches to developing and presenting dance, theater, performance, and other time-based arts.

The Master of Arts in Performance Curation is a two-year, low-residency program designed to study and enrich curatorial practices through intellectually rigorous and artist-centered methods, dialogues, writing, and fieldwork. ICPP works with a core group of faculty composed of renowned curators, artists, and scholars. Students and faculty meet three times a year on Wesleyan University’s campus, alongside engaging with field-wide symposia and artists’ residencies, and with visits to art institutions in New York City and the area. In addition, students have opportunities to work with a range of advisors on off-site practicums and independent projects tailored around their professional needs and research interests. Through the low-residency model, students simultaneously put ideas into practice in their professional lives, developing responsive curatorial practices that address performance as an artistic medium and a lens through which to interrogate and act upon social and political issues. Read what ICPP alumnx say about the program.

For more information about ICPP, click here. To contact us, email ICPP Program Manager Rosemary Lennox: rlennox@wesleyan.edu.

 

Community Engagement with Eric Segal

Eric Segal, Director of Education and Curator of Academic Programs at the Harn Museum of Art, discusses the ways in which the Harn Museum of Art promotes community engagement as part of a broader five-year diversity and inclusion plan. Segal explains the many ways in which the Museum is achieving this goal: through the Bishop Study Center, the Head Start Program, the “made by an immigrant” initiative, and the Tele-Tours.

Student Engagement with Eric Segal

In this segment, Eric Segal, Director of Education and Curator of Academic Programs at the Harn Museum of Art, speaks about student engagement. Segal expands on how the museum becomes a part of many students’ experiences at the University of Florida through a required freshman year course (The Good Life), volunteering, internships, and by having professors curate exhibitions from the collection which reflect their unique perspective and discipline.

Research at the Academic Art Museum with Martina Droth

As the Deputy Director of Research, Exhibitions and Publications, and Curator of Sculpture at the Yale Center for British Art, Martina Droth oversees research, which informs all facets of the museum: public programs, education, academic outreach, visiting scholars, student positions, exhibitions and publications. She discusses how research is outward-facing at the Yale Center for British Art, providing the space for scholars of different disciplines to share their knowledge. Instead of providing definitive answers, Yale Center for British Art is a museum passionate about interdisciplinary exploration and inquiry.