ASU Art Museum Receives 2018 Art for Justice Fund Grant

Arizona State University Art Museum has announced that it has secured a $125,000 grant through the Art for Justice Fund. This grant will allow the museum to continue to fight for meaningful and lasting criminal justice reform by conducting research for an exhibition titled “Undoing Time: A Visual History of Incarceration” and related public programs by the museum’s director, Miki Garcia, and curators Heather Sealy Lineberry and Julio Cesar Morales. (ASU)

To read more about the Art for Justice Fund and the 2018 fall recipients: https://artforjusticefund.org/2018-fall-grant-recipients-announced/

 

OTHERED: Displaced from Malaga at the University of Southern Maine Gallery

In the University of Southern Maine Gallery exhibition, OTHERED: Displaced from Malaga, artist Daniel Minter tells the story of the 1911 forced removal of a interracial fishing community on Maine’s Malaga Island in Phippsburg.

According to the Hyperallergic article, “For the past 10 years, Portland-based painter, children’s book author, and illustrator Daniel Minter has raised awareness of what happened on Malaga. He took part in archaeological digs and designed an information kiosk for people visiting the island. For his seven-week residency with the Department of Art at the University of Southern Maine this past fall, Minter created a series of 11 acrylic paintings, each one measuring 60 by 20 inches, that further his exploration of Malaga.”(Hyperallergic)

Image above: Installation view

Protesters Request RISD Museum Return Bronze Sculpture to Nigeria

A group of students and faculty from RISD and Brown University gathered at the RISD Museum on November 30 to pressure the museum to return stolen bronzes from the Kingdom of Benin and to decolonize the collection.

The reading material students passed out at the protest.

In response to the protest, the RISD Museum told Hyperallergic:

“The RISD Museum recognizes the looted status of the Head of a King (Oba) made by Benin royal artists in West Africa which was given to the collection in 1939. British forces sacked the Benin kingdom in 1897 in a campaign known as the Benin Punitive Expedition. Cities were burned; the reigning king, Oba Ovonranwmen, was forced into exile; and works of art and other treasures were looted. Soon after, museums and individuals throughout Europe and the United States were collecting Benin bronzes. We have initiated a process of communication with Oba Ewuare II and the National Commission for Museums and Monuments in Nigeria which has been established to address this very issue. We see this as an opportunity to confront the histories of colonialism that exist within museum collections.” (Hyperallergic)

A Manual for Art Freedom/A Manual for Art Censorship

A Manual for Art Freedom is a flip book that features tips for recognizing and navigating the many strategies used to silence creative expression. On its flip side and printed upside-down is A Manual for Art Censorship, a tongue-in-cheek guide that takes a look inside the mind of the censor while offering “how to” tips for banning and silencing “offensive” speech. (NCAC)

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Museum Best Practices for Managing Controversy

The Museum Best Practices for Managing Controversy is designed to provide museums and other cultural institutions of any size or scope with guidelines that can help manage controversial content and transform controversy into a learning moment about the nature of diverse opinions and an institution’s ability to address them. This non-binding document of best practices offers guidance to an institution concerned about or confronted with accusations of inappropriate, objectionable, or offensive content. Institutions caught in the frantic environment of controversy can refer to this set of strategies designed to calm the waters, open space for conversation and learning, and prevent or defuse a potentially volatile situation through deliberate steps to create meaningful dialogue. (NCAC)

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CAA Announces Guidelines for Faculty and Administrations Eliminating Arts and Humanities Programs and Departments

By any number of metrics, the arts and humanities are experiencing challenging times. In response to these challenges, some universities and colleges in the United States have cut programs, collapsed libraries, or shuttered entire departments. Over the past years, CAA has tracked these changes in higher education through the organization’s own research efforts and through narratives relayed directly from our members. These actions taken by administrations are in no way secret. In article after article, the alarm has been sounded. We believe there is a better way to resolve these issues and protect the arts and humanities at the same time.

To bridge this divide, CAA is pleased to release Guidelines for Addressing Proposed Substantive Changes to an art, Art History or Design Unit or Program at Colleges and Universities.

Editorial: Museum Symposium Presents Opportunity to Evaluate Western Canon at Oberlin, Broader Academia

Kate Fishman and Katie Lucey, the arts editors for The Oberlin Review, reflect on the necessity increased representation of underrepresented artists and curators and the need for academic courses outside of the Western-based cannon of art. This reflection comes in the wake of the Allen Memorial Art’s recent “Creating Space: Curating Black Art Now” symposium. (The Oberlin Review)

Image above by Claire Wang

“Transfer: Learning In and Through the Academic Museum,” co-authored by Liliana Milkova and Steven S. Volk

During a recent RAAMP Coffee Gathering with Liliana Milkova, Milkova spoke about the Allen Memorial Art’s pre and post museum visit surveys.  Milkova and Steven S. Volk, Oberlin’s director of the Center for Teaching, Innovation, and Excellence, co-analyze survey results in “Transfer: Learning In and Through the Academic Museum,” a chapter published in Advancing Engagement: A Handbook for Academic Museums, Volume III (2015).

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